What We Do

 

Our Juvenile Justice Mentoring Program is designed to help youth lay a spiritual foundation upon which they can build toward success in every aspect of life. This foundation is the launching point that empowers them to reach beyond themselves and their negative circumstances. The mentor comes along side a youth in a one to one relationship, becoming a trusted friend and guide. The relationship building may take place within a detention center, treatment facility, group, foster care or family home and continue as youth transition into the community. The mentor and the youth meet once a week for 1 to 4 hours. Over time, this relationship provides the youth with the tools needed to overcome the obstacles they face in their life.

Mission

To offer youth the promise of HOPE and a FUTURE through the power of a relationship with God and with a loving adult.

Vision

To join at-risk youth with adult Christian role models in order to use the power of relationships to change their hearts and redirect their lives towards God’s full purposes for them, their family and society.

 

Become a Mentor

Release is looking for Christian mentors over the age of 18 who have a heart for struggling/at-risk youth. You will be their friend, guide, and advocate. These youth simply need someone to listen to them and be an example of what it means to live in relationship with the Lord.

As a mentor you simply and powerfully….

Express Care… Challenge Growth… Provide Support… Share Power… Expand Possibilities

Your impact may include……

Empowerment…Positive Values…Social Competencies… Positive Identity…Willingness to trust (God and others)… Responsibility and Control…Constructive use of Time…Commitment to learning

The National Mentoring Partnership reports that mentoring has a vital connection to aspirations and outcomes:

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At-risk young adults who had a mentor are more likely to be enrolled in college than those who did not have a mentor (45 percent versus 29 percent).

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At-risk young adults who had a mentor are more likely to report participating regularly in sports or extracurricular activities than those who did not have a mentor (67 percent versus 37 percent).

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At-risk young adults who had a mentor are more likely to hold a leadership position in a club, sports team, school council, or another group than those who did not have a mentor (51 percent versus 22).

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At-risk young adults who had a mentor are more likely to volunteer regularly in their communities than those who did not have a mentor (48 percent versus 27).

Contact Us

 

For more information or to inquire about becoming a mentor please contact Marcus Brown by phone at 402-455-0808, by email at marcus@releaseinc.org or fill out the contact form.

 

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